@aperturefnd @aperturefnd Aperture Foundation
Aperture connects the photo community with the most inspiring work, the sharpest ideas, and with each other—in print, in person, and online.

@Aperturefnd Instagram posts

The Coast by Indian photographer Sohrab Hura begins with a surreal short story before leading into a sequence of photographs made along the coast of India. Following a propulsive, if elusive, narrative that guides the book using a structure of repetition, the unsettling and graphic nature of the images alludes to rampant violence—religious, caste, sexual, or otherwise—and the increasing normalization of it. “It is a surreal and hallucinatory work,” says @joannamilter, who juried the 2019 PhotoBook Awards shortlist, “At times, the images border on nightmarish, yet there is an element of wit present throughout.” . Winner of PhotoBook of the Year in this year’s 2019 @parisphotofair—Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards, read more about the full list of winning titles at aperture.org/blog . Plus, see the entire shortlist in our exhibition opening this Friday, November 22 at Aperture Gallery. More details at aperture.org/blog . Image: Sohrab Hura, The parrot and its fortuneteller, India, 2014; from The Coast (@uglydogbooks); 2019 Winner of PhotoBook of the Year © Sohrab Hura/Magnum Photos
Mark McKnight, Earthskin, 2018, from the series Decreation. . Winner of the 2019 Portfolio Prize, Mark McKnight’s black-and-white images of bodies and landscapes challenge Eurocentric ideas about male beauty—and aim to make “straight” photography a little less straight. Join us this Friday, November 22 for the opening reception of his exhibition at Aperture Gallery. For more details, see aperture.org/events . Also on view, this year’s 35 shortlisted titles for the 2019 @parisphotofair—Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards! . Image © @markwmcknight
Josef Koudelka, Slovakia, 1966. . One of the most seminal photobooks of the twentieth century, Josef Koudelka’s Gypsies offers an intimate glimpse into Europe's Roma communities, featuring photographs of Romani society taken between 1962 and 1971 in Czechoslovakia, Romania, Hungary, France, and Spain. Aperture first published this work in 1975, before releasing an extended edition in 2011. Now, we’re revisiting this foundational body of work again in a new, mini, paperback edition with updated texts by Stuart Alexander and Roma scholar and sociologist Will Guy. Available now through the link in bio. . Image © #JosefKoudelka / #MagnumPhotos
In 1962, Josef Koudelka began documenting the everyday lives of Europe’s Roma communities. Carrying only his equipment and a rucksack, Koudelka would spend the next decade moving between different Roma settlements and villages in then-Czechoslovakia, Romania, Hungary, France, and Spain. His resulting images offered an intimate glimpse into these largely marginalized communities, exploring themes of alienation and displacement. . Today, Gypsies remains one of the most seminal photobooks of the twentieth century. Aperture first published this work in 1975, before releasing an extended edition in 2011. Now, we’re revisiting this foundational body of work again in a new, mini, paperback edition with updated texts by Stuart Alexander and Roma scholar and sociologist Will Guy. Available now through the link in bio. . Image: Josef Koudelka, Romania, 1968 © #JosefKoudelka / #MagnumPhotos
When Brooklyn-based photographer @quillemons was growing up in South Philadelphia, he made a habit out of carrying around disposable cameras, shooting everything he saw. His work explores a range of topics, from queerness and masculinity, to Black femininity and the family photograph—but ultimately, he is interested in creating a record of his life and community. “I wanted to document my existence,” Lemons says, “Black history has not been properly documented. There are not many photos of Black joy or the average Black experience. I wanted to change that.” See more of Lemons’ work in The New Black Vanguard, available now through the link in bio. Plus! This Tuesday, hear from Lemons and @micaiahcarter during a panel discussion at @parsonsbfaphoto. For more details, see aperture.org/events
Gabriel Orozco isn’t interested in the decisive moment. Instead of following in the step of Mexican photographers dedicated to trying to penetrate “the country’s soul” by means of its people, Orozco instead focuses on the traces they leave behind in the world. But for Orozco, his photographs function, above all, as sculptural matter. Not the kind of sculpture made with a chisel, but one discovered in the configurations taking place randomly in the world—from sweat, shadows, futons, tortillas, and more—that can only be captured photographically. . From the latest issue of Aperture magazine, “Mexico City,” read more by María Minera at aperture.org/blog . Visita @revistagatopardo en gatopardo.com para leer este artículo en español . Image: Gabriel Orozco, Nubes de espuma, 2014; Courtesy the artist; Marian Goodman Gallery, New York; and Kurimanzutto, Mexico City/New York
“When evening falls, smaller flocks of birds appear from all directions and converge–uniting as a single, vast mass. Their movements almost resemble a dance….[creating] the appearance of a great, shifting shadow. It is like feeling the unidentifiable power brought about by being part of a great crowd, whereas the abilities of an individual on their own are limited.” –Rinko Kawauchi . In Halo (Aperture, 2017), Rinko Kawauchi knits together a mesmerizing exploration of the spirituality of the natural world, ranging from the southern coastal region of Izumo, Japan; New Year celebrations from Hebei province, China, where a five-hundred-year-old tradition has molten iron hurled in lieu of fireworks; and her ongoing fascination with the murmuration of birds along the coast of Brighton, England, Kawauchi’s images contemplate cycles of time, implicit and subliminal patterns of nature and human ritual, and the larger spiritual forces at place. Link in bio. . Image © Rinko Kawauchi
“Photography has this special quality embedded within it that makes it even more glorious and important the older it gets. We change as people, and the world changes around us, so the meaning and interpretation of our images necessarily shift as well, even for the artist who originally made them.” —Todd Hido . In our new book PhotoWork, @sashawolfprojects interviews forty photographers—from Robert Adams, Dawoud Bey, Todd Hido, Rinko Kawauchi, Alec Soth and more—about their approach to making photographs and sustaining a body of work. Structured as a Proust-like questionnaire, the resulting interviews provide essential insights and advice from both emerging and established photographers—while also revealing there is no single path in photography. Available now through the link in bio. . Image: Todd Hido, #6405 , 2007, from A Road Divided (2010) #AperturePhotoWork
Photographing throughout rural communities in the Pacific Northwest, Garrett Grove documents growing cultural tensions in the years leading up to and following the 2016 presidential election. Although the world Grove captures features familiar scenes of the American West, his work examines a larger shift in the landscapes and mythologies of the region. In photographs that range from anxious, humorous, strange, to deeply ambiguous, Grove states, “I am interested in taking the viewer into a psychological state filled with unknowns and non-answers.” . Read more by Cassidy Paul (@cassidypaul_) in the latest installment of our series “Introducing,” which highlights exciting new voices in photography at aperture.org/blog . Image: @grove_garrett, Untitled (Okanogan Complex), 2015, from the series Errors of Possession © the artist
In the years leading up to and following the 2016 US presidential election, Garrett Grove began photographing in and around small coastal, farming, and logging towns in the Pacific Northwest examining the region’s growing cultural tensions. Initially inspired by early black-and-white archival photographs of agriculture and industry workers during the cultivation of the American West, Grove intentionally plays within the documentary genre. The resulting images in his series Errors of Possession range from anxious, humorous, strange, to deeply ambiguous. Tracks in a field create extraterrestrial-like symbols, a man slides down a mountain of potatoes, halos of light outline a mother and daughter, and cowboy hats float above a sea of trees. Although the world Grove captures features familiar scenes of the American West, his photographs hint at larger shift in landscape and mythology. “I don’t think it provides any answers, but it does take the confusion that I was—and am—feeling and infuses it into the work,” @grove_garrett says. “I’d hope that this work offers a new way of looking at and thinking about the American dream.” . Read more by Cassidy Paul (@cassidypaul_) in the latest installment of our series “Introducing,” which highlights exciting new voices in photography at aperture.org/blog . Image: Garrett Grove, Untitled (José & Potatoes), 2016, from the series Errors of Possession © the artist
“Many of Tania Franco Klein’s photographs depict female figures who seem lost in the vastness of an inhospitable landscape or in a moment of contemplation, the edges of the self contained within those of a geometrical interior. Her images are bathed in a warm cinematic light, boudoir red, and suffused with a Lynchian sense of menace—they resemble film stills taken midnarrative, though it’s unclear whether the climactic moment has yet taken place.” —Chloe Aridjis . Inspired by Mexico City’s Sonora Market, @taniafrancoklein’s cinematic new series depicts an unshakeable belief in enchantment. From Aperture magazine’s “Mexico City” issue, read more at aperture.org/blog . Image: Tania Franco Klein, Mercado de Sonora, 2019, for Aperture; Courtesy the artist
Over the course of five years, @chloedewemathews explored the region bordering the Caspian Sea, recording the ways in which materials such as oil, fire, uranium, and water are integral to the mystical, economic, artistic, religious, and therapeutic aspects of daily life. In this image, a young woman bathes in crude oil at the sanatorium town of Naftalan.This “miracle oil” is found exclusively in the semidesert region of central Azerbaijan, and it is claimed that bathing in it for ten minutres a day has medicinal benefits. . See more in Caspian: The Elements (Aperture, 2018), available through the link in bio. . Image © Chloe Dewe Matthews; Aperture/Peabody Museum Press